Author Archives: guestblogger99

EEOC files lawsuit against Sonic Drive-In for sexual harassment and retaliation

The EEOC filed a lawsuit against Sonic Drive-In of Los Lunas, Ltd., and B&B Consultants, Inc., doing business as Sonic Drive-In in Los Lunas, N.M., for not stopping a Sonic supervisor from subjecting female employees to sexual harassment and retaliating against the women who complained about the hostile work environment.

The EEOC lawsuit alleges that a number of female employees were forced to endure pervasive sexual comments and innuendo and unwelcome touching of bodies.  The lawsuit claims that the ongoing harassment and retaliation caused several women to leave their jobs at Sonic Drive-In.

“Our investigation revealed that a managerial supervisor was permitted to harass these women in the workplace and Sonic did not act promptly to provide corrective relief.” said EEOC Phoenix Acting District Director Rayford Irvin. “Employers have an important responsibility to protect their employees from harassment and retaliation in the workplace.”

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The boss who fired himself

Riley Drake, as CFO of a company that provides management services for trade shows, witnessed a budget crisis unfolding after a number of clients canceled orders last year.  Drake saw the need to reduce overhead to keep the company within budget, and he believed that the company had little choice but to lay off one of its workers.

In a bold step, Drake decided that he would resign his position so that none of his colleagues would have to be laid off.  His CEO was surprised at his willingness to sacrifice his job, especially in the midst of a deep recession, but she accepted his resignation.

Drake then decided to start his own business, CFO4Lease, to offer financial guidance and assistance to small and mid-sized companies that aren’t yet large enough to afford a full-time chief financial officer.

We commend good bosses like Riley Drake who place the well-being of their employees above their own.  We support Drake in his new endeavor, and we encourage companies to do business with CFO4Lease.

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Raiders coach Tom Cable could be arrested for punching assistant coach

Oakland Raiders coach Tom Cable might soon be arrested for allegedly punching assistant coach Randy Hanson on August 5 while the Raiders were in training camp.  Hanson suffered a broken jaw from the attack.

Cable could also face a suspension from the NFL for violating the personal conduct policy if he is arrested.  We wonder why this bully boss wasn’t fired immediately following the assault.  Physical violence should not be tolerated in the workplace.

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St. Louis Rams Pays $134,000 to Settle Disability Discrimination Lawsuit

The EEOC announced that the St. Louis Rams has agreed to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit that was filed against the NFL team for firing a veteran trainer, Ron DuBuque, because he has epilepsy.

The Rams will pay $134,000 to settle the lawsuit and has agreed to employ DuBuque as a Rehabilitation Specialist for two years.  DuBuque had been an assistant trainer with the Rams for 11 years before he was fired, and he had been diagnosed with epilepsy years before he started working for the NFL team.

EEOC Acting Chairman Stuart J. Ishimaru said, “As this case and many others show, disability does not mean inability.  All employers should make workplace decisions based on merit and qualifications to do the job, rather than on myths, fears, or stereotypes associated with a person’s disability.”

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Job Interview Tip: Google Your Potential Boss

The following is a post from one of our guest bloggers:

When you see the headline “Job Interview TipGoogle your Potential Boss”, you must be wondering what eBossWatch is referring to?  Well, let me tell you about a personal experience from last year.  

Given the current economic condition, we are in what is referred to as an employer’s market.  I was invited into an interview in a major city and I when I saw the agenda, I could not believe the schedule.  It was an all-day interview, which lead me to believe they were just using that time to find things wrong with candidates and to be overly critical.  Nonetheless, I went to the interview and was appalled to discover that another candidate for the same role had been invited there for the same time – a big red flag and inappropriate. 

I went through the all-day job interview without being offered lunch and was dying to get home.  The potential boss seemed amiable, but I believe he went overboard for this easy position.  His name was very distinctive and he told me where he used to live.  When I returned home from the job interview, I Googled this boss and this is the headline that I found of an article about him from a major newspaper:  “Candidate charged with indecent exposure in ’97”

Anyway, I never heard back from that company, and it was probably a blessing in disguise. 

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Is David Letterman a Toxic Boss?

The ReallyBadBoss.com website mentioned the recent David Letterman controversy which has swept news headlines nationwide.  Letterman was the target of a $2 million blackmail scheme carried out by CBS 48 Hours producer John Halderman, who had threatened to publicize Letterman’s affairs with a number of his employees. 

Here’s the ReallyBadBoss.com take on the David Letterman scandal: “We covered the dangers of even consensual boss/subordinate relationships a couple of weeks ago.  Besides being a morale buster, it opens employers up to the threat of lawsuits.  And frankly, I don’t buy the argument that every consensual boss/subordinate relationship is, well, consensual.  When the person who signs your paycheck tells you he wants to sleep with you, the balance shifts, and what would be an easy ‘hell no’ in any other circumstance becomes a little less cut and dry.”

Should bosses who have sex with their employees be considered toxic and unfit to continue managing their employees?

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What to do if you are being bullied at work

Good Morning America” viewers emailed their questions to Tory Johnson, and she offered advice about how to identify and deal with a workplace bully

Johnson identified the following common forms of workplace bullying:

  • Humiliating comments or actions
  • Excessive yelling
  • Undermining your status at work
  • Failing to give credit

Johnson recommends the following actions for people to try to stop workplace bullies from targeting them:

  • Stop the bullying on the spot
  • Walk away from a tirade
  • Confront the bully calmly
  • Document the abuse
  • Find a new job

Tory Johnson is the workplace contributor on “Good Morning America” and the CEO of Women for Hire

Click here to read the entire report

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What to do when a former boss lies during a reference check

A job seeker submitted a question to a Q&A forum on Lawyers.com.  She was offered a job, conditional on receiving positive references from her past bosses. 

But when the new employer checked with the job seeker’s previous employers, her last boss lied and said that she stole some items and had attendance issues. 

Click here for the entire post. 

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Judge OK’s Former Hooters Girl Discrimination Lawsuit Against Hawaiian Tropic Zone

Manhattan supreme Court Judge Edward Lehner greenlighted the discrimination and hostile workplace lawsuit filed by former Hooters Girl Melody Morales against the Hawaiian Tropic Zone restaurant, which is located in Times Square.

Morales, 22, sued the Times Square restaurant in January after the stunner with a 34-D cup size says she was twice rejected for a job by managers who didn't much care for her "Latin accent."

Morales, 22, sued the restaurant in January 2009 after two hiring managers rejected her for a job because they allegedly didn’t like her “Latin accent.”  Morales is of mixed Dominican and Puerto Rican background.

The Hawaiian Tropic Zone, which refers to itself as “The Hottest Place on Earth,” is also facing a $600 million federal lawsuit from four former female workers accusing an ex-boss of sickening and widespread sexual harassment and a hostile workplace.

The harassment eventually escalated into rape and forcible sodomy. The women — a former senior manager, a bartender, a hostess and an office assistant — claim their former boss, Anthony Rakis, subjected them to months of lewd and toxic behavior while management turned a blind eye.  In September 2006, the suit alleges, Rakis drugged and brutally raped ex-senior manager Giulietta Consalvo in a taxi.

According to the lawsuit, Anthony Rakis, a married, 40-year-old father of two, “is a rapist and sexual predator who was given full rein by the Riese Organization to sexually assault, molest, batter and rape the female employees.  In that sense, he was not unlike a pedophile at a daycare center.”

Also targeted in the lawsuit is popular Manhattan chef David Burke, who allegedly groped Consalvo and others. Burke devised the menu for the Hawaiian Tropic Zone restaurant.

Sources: NYDailyNews.com and NYPost.com

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New web site lets state workers rate their bosses

Article Source:  http://tinyurl.com/yd2w9sb

For state workers who’ve ever dreamed of taking revenge on a bad boss — or wished to do something nice for a particularly good one — there’s a new web site that will give you the opportunity to do just that.

Well, not you: State workers in California will have to wait.

Aizonu.com is set to launch within the next three weeks. It will let state workers in at least six states log in to rate current or former bosses. The site is designed to make most of its revenue from a combination of advertising and small fees charged to anyone who wants to buy a full report on a particular boss — for instance, someone deciding on whether or not to take a job under that manager.

While the site is based out of the Sacramento area and was inspired by the founder’s experience working for the state of California, it won’t include reviews on bosses in the Golden State. There is a huge amount of state worker data available via public records; such data is the backbone of the Capitol salary database offered by the Capitol Weekly and the state worker salary database operated by the Sacramento Bee.
But Aizonu.com seeks to verify that anybody who signs up to write evaluations actually worked for who they say they work for. This is intended to keep people honest — for instance, preventing someone from trashing an ex-lover or difficult neighbor who they never actually worked for.
California lacks that kind of data for its huge state workforce. While public employee data is readily available across several state agencies, the ability to link individual employees with particular bosses is lacking.
“We could tell you that employee John Doe works at the Department of Social Services, makes X amount a year, was paid this amount on overtime, has a job classification of staff services manager,” said Garin Casaleggio, a spokesman Controller John Chiang’s office. “We wouldn’t be able to tell you who their boss would be. We could tell you all the managers in that department. But you wouldn’t ever be able to draw a line and say ‘who does this employee manage?’”
“It seems almost like you’d have to verify with each department,” said Steve Caldwell, director of legislative and public affairs with the California State Personnel Board (SPB). He added, “I could work at 10 different departments over the years. You’d have to verify who worked there at each time. That sounds difficult.”
So far, six states have been able to provide the necessa

ry data, according to Aizonu.com’s founder: Colorado, Florida, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, and West Virginia. They have at least some data from several other states, which they hope to add soon after launch: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, and Illinois. Some of these are obviously large states, but none has a workforce as big as the 238,000 employed by California. In some cases, this data cost up to $1,600 per state, though in most cases it costs under $1,000. Aizonu.com’s founder is currently trying to get the data for California and the 37 other states.
The lack of the Golden State in Aizonu.com’s launch is ironic, given that the site was inspired by an experience in the California state workforce. Aizonu.com’s founder, who wishes to remain anonymous for the time being, said she worked in a state agency where her manager fired several people without cause in just a few months. The founder said she asked the boss about the firings, and was essentially told that no one could do anything about it.
Given how unpleasant it is to work for a really bad boss, she said many people would find it worthwhile to log onto the site and pay a small fee to find out other employees’ opinions of a potential boss—even for positions paying only $30,000 a year.
There is a potential upside for the state, according to the mission statement currently posted at the site: by exposing bad managers, the state could save over the long term.
 ”The number of recorded appeals from public workers is astronomical; the amount of taxpayer’s dollars spent in legal fees is troublesome… AIZONU allows job seekers, other state employees, state departments, high level management and the public, to set eyes on a department, its management and practices thus providing an opportunity to evaluate working stats, make pellucid employment decisions, significantly increase work satisfaction and consequently save tax dollars.”
The founder has been trying to get the necessary information from a variety of state agencies via public records act requests since at least April. In addition to the Controller’s office and SPD, they have contacted the Department of Personnel Administration office seeking information including:
–Number of lawsuits against the state of California by state employees in the past 4 years.
–Number of transfers within departments in the last 3 years
–Number of layoffs while on probation in the last 3 years
–Number of discrimination complaints filed within the last 3 years
–All current and former (5 yrs) state employees names and their appropriate email.

On this last request, the general counsel with the SPB replied Sept. 10 and 14 “SPB has no public records within the scope of your request.”
Numerous ratings sites have popped up on the Internet in recent years. Few, however, make money directly off visitors, usually surviving on advertising revenue. One of the most successful is Yelp, which lets people rate businesses—and sells “Check us out on Yelp” stickers to businesses who have ratings they actually want people to see.
There are other sites that rate actual people. Some job sites include sections where people can rate bosses in various fields, but these sites are generally supported by business that pay for job listings.
Another example is RateMyProfessor.com, an ad-supported site that lets students rate professors and professors can respond. But that site takes a fairly low-tech approach, letting people leave anonymous ratings with no verification they ever had a particular teacher.